10 Commandments of Staff Engagement

Every team has “rules of engagement” or a “code” to live by. If you’re leading a church staff, you’ve got to have some kind of direction you expect everyone to run in. Here’s ours at Redemption Church Gateway.

Leading Staff

01 / PRIORITIZE YOUR RELATIONSHIP WITH JESUS
Everything in your life and ministry flows out of your relationship with Jesus. This is your top priority, and we must help each other grow as disciples of Jesus.

02 / EQUIP, EQUIP, EQUIP
Develop leaders and prepare the saints to do ministry. When possible, bring people along with whatever you’re doing. Don’t get stuck doing ministry. Equip the saints to do the work of the ministry. If a volunteer can do it, help empower them to win.

03 / IT’S ABOUT PEOPLE, NOT TASKS
The focus of our ministry is helping people grow as disciples. Our systems and tasks should enhance, not distract from, the priority of investing in people.

04 / LEARN CONSTANTLY
Always be reading and listening to things that sharpen you. “A woodcutter never wasted time by sharpening his ax.” Additionally, be teachable and learn from other people, even through criticism.

05 / WORK HARD
“Whatever you do, work heartily, as for the Lord and not for men, knowing that from the Lord you will receive the inheritance as your reward. You are serving the Lord Christ.” (Col 3:23)

06 / CHEAT THE CHURCH, NOT YOUR FAMILY
Jesus died for the church, you don’t have to. He promises to build his church and commands you to shepherd your wife and kids.

07 / BE ON TIME
Help create a culture of punctuality and respect.

08 / CLARIFY THE WIN
Know the vision and purpose of any ministry environment or event, and cast the vision in a clear and compelling way.

09 / LISTEN TO OUTSIDERS
The unchurched never have a voice in the church. Be that voice. We will focus on who we are trying to reach, not who we are trying to keep.

10 / CHOOSE TO TRUST
We will develop a culture of trust, built on these six commitments:

  1. I will believe the best about my fellow staff.
  2. When other people assume the worst about you, I will come to your defense.
  3. If what I experience begins to erode my trust, I will come directly to you to talk about it.
  4. When I am convinced I will not be able to deliver on a promise, I will come to you ahead of time.
  5. When you confront me about the gaps I’ve created, I will tell you the truth.
  6. I will openly share warnings or disagreements when a decision is being considered, but I will champion and defend the decision after it is made.

Questions:

Which of these stands out to you? If you lead others, what are some of the “rules of engagement” you emphasize?

Published by

Luke Simmons

I was born and raised in Denver, CO and lived there through high school. Then I moved to Champaign, IL where I attended the University of Illinois and played on the Fighting Illini baseball team. I was married in December, 2001 to Molly, who I met at the U of I. In June of 2002, we moved to Phoenix and have been here ever since. In July of 2006, we welcomed a baby girl, Abby, into our family.

4 thoughts on “10 Commandments of Staff Engagement”

  1. Luke,

    #10 has been huge for created a healthy environment and building trust.

    #3 is the area that I need to grow in most.

    #9 is the most unique.

    I like the list because there are high standards, yet flexibility, and it’s anchored in a the priority of walking with Jesus.

    Somewhat related to # 8, one question I’ve been thinking about lately is the extent of measurability for some goals, especially goals connected to spiritual growth. Many leadership books talk about how goals need to be “reachable, attainable, and measurable”, but it seems like some things like humility, love, etc. are hard to measure. Do you have any advice on setting goals about those things? Do you ever set goals around those things?

    1. That’s a good question. I’ve had times where I’ve set particular goals around something that’s more qualitative. Things like, “Serve my family in X ways.” But that still doesn’t necessarily measure the heart. Additionally, I think that spiritual growth is usually best measured over time.

      As you’ve been thinking about it, what thoughts do you have?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s